sewanee wc [the wick]

We are 12 undergraduate students trying to make a difference.
We attend a small liberal arts college in Sewanee, TN.
We work and live in the Women’s Center.
We are feminists.
We have things to say. We have stories and experiences to share. We think they’re pretty important and at the very least, entertaining. Someone said we should start a blog.
We said- why not?
This is us, in the simple (but often not so simple) day-to-day.

http://life.sewanee.edu/live/women-at-sewanee

@bairnwick_womens_center

Student Assaults add burden to accusers

Now an examination of other cases from recent years shows a pattern to the handling of sexual assault complaints by Florida State students: After an accuser makes a police report and submits to a medical rape exam, the police ask if she wants them to investigate, and if she does not explicitly agree, they drop the case, often calling her uncooperative.

About a year ago I was walking home from class on a rainy day when a man slowed his car next to me and, assuming I was female, began catcalling me. He offered me a ride. He repeatedly asked for my number, asked if I had a boyfriend.

If you’re male, this is something you are never taught how to deal with. You hear stories about catcalling and harassment but you never understand how invasive it is until you experience it firsthand.

albinwonderland:

allthecanadianpolitics:

Aboriginal women ask Stephen Harper: Am I next?

Am I next?

That’s the question aboriginal women are asking Prime Minister Stephen Harper in a new online campaign to renew pressure on his government to call a national inquiry into murdered and missing indigenous women.

Coming on the heels of Harper’s "sociological phenomenon" blunder, the campaign is the brainchild of Holly Jarrett. She’s the cousin of Loretta Saunders, a 26-year-old Inuit student at Saint Mary’s University who was murdered earlier this year. At the time of her death, Saunders was working on her thesis on murdered and missing aboriginal women.

"She had come through a lot of the same kind of struggles that a lot women affected by colonialism and residential school stuff," Jarrett told PressProgress Friday, a day after  launching the Am I Next campaign.

"We wanted to move it forward for her. She was really passionate about telling her story, to stand up and tell the brutal truth," said Jarrett, an Inuit from the Labrador coast who’s now based in Hamilton, Ont.

After organizing one of the largest petitions at change.org calling on the government to launch a public inquiry into hundreds of missing and murdered aboriginal women, Jarrett decided to launch the Am I Next campaign.

It’s inspired by the Inuktitut word ain, a term of endearment for someone you love in her native language.

Here are some of the faces of the viral campaign:

This is what comes to mind when people try to tell me there is no (or less) racism in Canada. Hundreds of aboriginal and First Nations women are missing, abused, and murdered, and our country and GOVERNMENT doesn’t care. It doesn’t. Indigenous women don’t matter to our government and it’s horrifying.  Please click some of the above mentioned links and learn about these women and this campaign. 

(via darkhoshekh)

nubbsgalore:

september 8 is international literacy day. globally, two thirds of the 775,000,000 illiterate adults, and 63% of the 126 million illiterate youth, are female. the discrepancy is a result of 33,000,000 fewer girls attending primary school than boys. but any child born to a literate mother is twice as likely to be immunized and live past the age of five, and is also twice as likely to receive an education. (sources here)

photos by (click pic) joey l. at a school for hamar girls in labaltoy, ethiopia; muhammed muheisen in pakistan; altaf gadri at an unofficial school run for slum dwellers held under a bridge in new delhi; paula bronstein at a thai refugee camp for burmese refugees; reuters, from a school in bori bana, a slum in abidjan, ivory coast; zohra bensemra from a school at a refugee camp in islamabad; anja niedringhaus at a makeshift school in budyali, afghanistan; kate holt in makuyuni, tanzania; reuters, from a school in islamabad; and lana slezic from a bombed out school in afghanistan. 

(via humanrightswatch)

Pussy Riot’s Next Move

bustmagazine:

pussy-riot-london 2312825k


Originally affecting change through their radical music performances while donning colorful ski masks, Pussy Riot’s next move to reform Russia is perhaps even bolder. Two of the original three members, Nadya Tolokonnikova and Maria Alekhina, are launching an independent news outlet, MediaZona. The focus of the project is to keep Russian c… Read More

From BUST.com

dynastylnoire:

stayxsvckaxfree:

From the Strolling Series by Cecile Emeke

free condoms; pay for tampons, typecasting, “selling out”, rape culture & more

I love this series, and everything she said completely resonated with me, especially when she talked about how black men (#FakeDeeps, as Cecile cleverly put it) contribute to sexism towards black women. I think it’s important that feminism places women as central to the cause, and I loved how she spoke from her who point of view as a black women. 

The Filmaker’s Info 

Website: cecileemeke.com
Vimeo: vimeo.com/cecileemeke
FB: facebook.com/cecileemeke
Tumblr: cecileemeke.tumblr.com
Instagram: @cecileemeke
Twitter: @cecileemeke

(via fearlessfeminism)

huffingtonpost:

Famous Women Point Out Exactly Why Leaking Nude Photos Is So Very Wrong

This past Sunday, a 4chan user posted nude and revealing photos online, supposedly hacked from the iCloud accounts of numerous female celebrities such as Jennifer Lawrence, Kate Upton, Lea Michele and more. While some outlets have reported this leak as a juicy celebrity “scandal,” it’s more accurately described as a sex crime.

For more celebrity reactions including Mary E. Winstead and Kirsten Dunst go here. 

(via the-daily-feminist)

aauw:

Can we get a YAAAAASSSS?!
19 years ago today, these true words were spoken at the U.N. Fourth Conference on Women. Learn more about why the conference was groundbreaking for women here: http://bit.ly/1z6kPIN

aauw:

Can we get a YAAAAASSSS?!

19 years ago today, these true words were spoken at the U.N. Fourth Conference on Women. Learn more about why the conference was groundbreaking for women here: http://bit.ly/1z6kPIN