sewanee wc [the wick]

We are 12 undergraduate students trying to make a difference.
We attend a small liberal arts college in Sewanee, TN.
We work and live in the Women’s Center.
We are feminists.
We have things to say. We have stories and experiences to share. We think they’re pretty important and at the very least, entertaining. Someone said we should start a blog.
We said- why not?
This is us, in the simple (but often not so simple) day-to-day.

http://life.sewanee.edu/live/women-at-sewanee

@bairnwick_womens_center
micdotcom:

Forget the spreadsheet, here’s an easy flowchart to know if a women owes you sex

Microsoft Excel took a turn for the explicit this week when the Internet learned the once-innocuous office tool was being used in a dispiriting new bro-trend: using the software to track of the number of times their partners refuse sex. Yes, #sexspreadsheets are a thing, presumably because some men still believe that owning of a penis entitles them to unlimited sexy times.
Sorry, guys, that’s just not the way the world works | Follow micdotcom 

micdotcom:

Forget the spreadsheet, here’s an easy flowchart to know if a women owes you sex

Microsoft Excel took a turn for the explicit this week when the Internet learned the once-innocuous office tool was being used in a dispiriting new bro-trend: using the software to track of the number of times their partners refuse sex. Yes, #sexspreadsheets are a thing, presumably because some men still believe that owning of a penis entitles them to unlimited sexy times.

Sorry, guys, that’s just not the way the world works | Follow micdotcom 

(via fuckyeahsexeducation)

The Morning Stimulator: You Won't Believe What This Model Just Did To Challenge Ideas About Gender

The Wick: Is it just another Manic Monday? It doesn’t have to be. As this video displays, break free. Interpret that however it fits you best. With lots of love this Monday, the Wick.

7 Reasons Women’s Clothing Sizes Make No Sense | Stuff Mom Never Told You

stuffmomnevertoldyou:

When women began transitioning from homemade or seamstress-made clothing to ready-to-wear, sizing was problematic from the start. Back then, many women’s sizes were centered around the hourglass ideal of a 36-inch bust, 26-inch waist and 36-inch hips. One frustrated department store executive told The New York Times in 1927, “I don’t know who the mythical size 36 is who forms the basis of sizing, but average, tall, short, thin and plump women come into a department store and the 36 size fits none of them.”

studgenius:

jessicaisgray:

"When I got into the music industry a majority of female artists I’d seen were trying to regurgitate an ideal of the female image. They were trying to be almost a replica of what was popular. I just found that to be very boring and dishonest. I just wanted to be in control of my clothes. I wanted that choice. That’s the only thing that I’m saying. Women should not be marginalized. We shouldn’t play into the sexism." - Janelle Monae [x[

(via fearlessfeminism)